Hound Dog Breeds (List 2021)

Hound Dog Breeds:- Renowned for their exceptional scenting abilities or great speed and keen sight, hounds serve hunters to track sport quarry predating firearms.

Diverse in physique and behavior (greyhounds to dachshunds,) their commonality is hunter service. Anciently depicted as a nobleman’s companion, speed hounds possess power, swiftness, and keen sight.

Today, swift greyhounds compete in races and bloodhounds aid law enforcement officials in tracking missing persons or fugitives. They are excellent as reliable, sturdy, stamina pets; beware of their chasing propensities.

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List of Hound Dog Breeds

Hound Dog Breeds | From {A to C}

Afghan hound

Afghan hound

The Afghan hound is a Sighthound, or Gazehound, depending on whom you ask and what term they use. This is a special kind of breed that hunts primarily with sight and speed in contrast to scent.

They excel in hunting with their super-human speed and ability to keep the prey before their eyes. They eventually overpower the creature they’re chasing.

A lean, slim, some would say gaunt, body and big lungs are some of the features that enable the Afghan hound in these great feats of hunting.

The Afghan hound’s head is even aerodynamic. The Afghan hound can also be used in racing due to its innate features and abilities. Afghan hounds have an appearance denoting supreme austerity and haughtiness.

Their distinctive coat and body style come together in a way that symbolizes royalty. True to royalty, the temperament can be cold and reserved in the midst of its pursuits, but it can be very playful and happy-go-lucky when it decides to relax and be playful. 

American Black and Tan Coonhound

American Black and Tan Coonhound

The American Black and Tan Coonhound is, foremost, a working dog that does well on the trail, chases the prey up trees, and can forego comfort when it’s forced to withstand difficult terrain and harsh temperatures.

The dog’s main purpose and use are hunting raccoons. It hunts by scent alone. It excels at trailing them and chasing them up into trees.

Its other features like bravery and endurance make it suitable for hunting various types of wild game. It can even trail bears and moose.

The dog itself is strong, agile, courageous, and it has a strong, rhythmic, powerful gait. Its strides are wide, and it covers a lot of terrain in a short amount of time. 

American Foxhound

American Foxhound

The American Foxhound descended from the English, French, and Irish Foxhound. They are the oldest sporting dogs in America.

This breed was bred to hunt fox and other animals in the woodlands of eastern America. The American Foxhound would rather hunt alone than in packs; it is lighter-boned and looks more like a hound dog than its cousin, the English Foxhound.

American Staghound

American Staghound

The American Staghound is not recognized as a breed. It is a type of sighthound that is used for pursuing games.

A running dog, the American Staghound is thought of as a Greyhound prototype. They are said to have speeds that approach that of a Greyhound, but they are also known for their endurance over the Greyhound. Craving for the attention of their owners, this breed also makes a great companion.

Balkan Hound

 Balkan Hound

The Balkan Hound ancestors are thought to have originated in Egypt and brought to Europe by the Phoenicians around 1000 BC.

The Balkan Hound came from Yugoslavia and was bred for tracking and hunting big game. Balkan Hounds frequently work in packs to hunt and track wild boar and deer.

Basenji

Basenji

You couldn’t tell by the clean-cut, cropped appearance, but the Basenji is a sighthound. Sighthounds are a type of hunting dog that has intense, fervid vision, super speed, and an overpowering takedown move.

If these traits sound too ethereal, you’re not alone. The Basenji originated in the jungles of Africa, and it’s still used today as a hunting dog.

The dog has no inherent bark. Rather, it makes a sound like a yodel. The small, stately dog is funnily similar to a cat because it cleans itself and loves to climb.

Pet owners should know that their activity levels don’t correspond to their relative silence. In fact, they’re very active, and they need chew toys and master-pet interaction on a regular basis.

A Basenji revels in human attention. Petting, hugging, stroking, and caressing are good for it. They can require most of your attention, and they take to following their masters around the house.

Basenjis tag along with children. In other words, the Basenjis tag along everywhere with some children in the household.

Basset Artesian Normand

Basset Artesian Normand

The Basset Artesian Normand is similar in appearance to the Basset Hound but lighter in weight. It makes a gentle and trustworthy pet.

The Basset Artesian Normand originated in Artois and Normandy. It is used for hunting foxes and hares. Like other bassets, it will go into lairs after its prey. This breed enjoys long walks, but be careful when they find an interesting scent and go off their lead.

Basset Bleu de Gascogne

Basset Bleu de Gascogne

The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is a hunting dog that was prominent in the south and southwest of France in the Gascogne region, from which its name is taken.

The Basset Bleu de Gascogne is part of the foundation of all the hound breeds called “Dogs of the Midi” (South of France.)

The use of this dog for pack hunting has slowly been disappearing and the breed is in danger of extinction.

Basset Hound

Basset Hound

The Basset Hound, like the Bloodhound, is a scent hound. Its ears are unduly long, have a texture akin to velvet, and can even reach to the tip of the nose when folded forward.

This is no easy task because the muzzle extends quite long. The ears are about 12 inches long to the naked eye. The Basset Hound has a higher bone ratio than any other dog.

It has more bone mass, in proportion to the rest of its body than any other breed. The French origin of the name means either low or quite low. Hound, is, of course, just a catchall for dogs that aid hunters by chasing or tracking animals. 

Bavarian Mountain

Bavarian Mountain Hound

The Bavarian Mountain Hound is a descendant of primitive hunting dogs, the Hanoverian and Tyrolean scenthounds.

This rare breed was founded in 1912 and was used as a hunting dog primarily for trailing wounded games.

The breed is a bigger than average hunting dog and is known to have a sleek and very athletic-looking body type as well as being not susceptible to many diseases.

Beagle

Beagle

The Beagle is a type of hound with a yielding, supple expression. There’s nothing really averse about this dog’s personality.

The dog is brave, bold, and affectionate. It cherishes the company of people, children, strangers, and other pets. It’s unafraid to try new things; it’s not reticent or scared.

Its expression and disposition are endearing. It weighs 20 to 25 pounds so it can be picked up by children and carried hither and thither. It measures 22 to 25 inches for males and 20 to 23 inches for females.

Bernese Hound

Bernese Hound

The Bernese Hound is an independent yet friendly breed that is from the Swiss Alps. An ancient breed, its presence in the times of the Roman Helvetica was shown on a mosaic discovered in Avenches.

The Bernese Hounds were primarily used to hunt fox, deer, and boar. They are normally very active and can make good pets provided they are able to get plenty of exercises.

Blackmouth Cur

Blackmouth Cur

Early American settlers used The Blackmouth Cur as an all-around working dog. The exact origin is in disagreement, but it originated in the United States.

They served as hunting dogs and family guardians as the settlers moved west. This breed has also been widely used as an agile tree dog. The Blackmouth Cur is a fast, hard hunter that finds game using its eyes, ears, and nose.

Bloodhound

Bloodhound

The Bloodhound, St. Hubert’s Hound, and Chien de Saint-Hubert are three names for this special dog breed.

Trailers, trackers, and policemen attest to the dog’s ability to track a person over many miles with a scent that’s several hours or days old.

Escapees kidnapped victims, and missing persons owe their jail sentences or lives to the keen sense of smell and innate tracking characteristics of Bloodhounds.

It’s not bred to track animals; in contrast, human beings are its main fare. You’ll know a bloodhound by its droopy, shaggy ears and wrinkly face. Somber, serious, and elderly are the anthropomorphic characteristics we attribute to its natural facial expression.

Bluetick Coonhound

Bluetick Coonhound

Breeders in Louisiana created the Bluetick Coonhound by mixing Foxhounds, Curs, French Hounds, and English Coonhounds. This breed is a physically powerful and tireless hunting and treeing dog.

Their hunting approach is courageous and unrelenting. The Bluetick Coonhound is a loyal and devoted breed, which makes it an excellent companion. It can either live indoors or outdoors and makes great guard dogs as well.

Borzoi

Borzoi

The Borzoi is also known as the Russian Wolfhound, Russkaya Psovaya Borzaya, and Psowaya Barsaya. The Borzoi looks like a Greyhound with long hair, and it’s a stately, aristocratic, and dignified dog with an unusual and memorable shape to its body.

The hallmark curve or arch to the back produces an equally distinct shape to the underside. The coat can be white, gold, tan, or gray, but it can come in virtually any color or combination thereof.

The coat is soft, silky, and either curly or wavy. It’s a type of ancient sighthound that’s well-suited to adults and proper household settings. 

Briquet Griffon Vendeen

Briquet Griffon Vendeen

The Briquet Griffon Vendeen is one of the four rough-coated breeds from the west coast of France in the Vendee region. Believed to have descended from the Vendeen hounds of the Gris de St. Louis.

The breed was severely reduced during World War II and is still relatively unknown even in France. They are primarily used for hunting hare, fox, and even big game.

Carolina Dog

Carolina Dog

The Carolina Dogs’ origin can be traced back to 9000-6000 BC in North America, possibly being a descendant of the dogs that came across the land bridge over the Bering Strait with Asians.

The Native Americans used this breed as a herder and hunter. The Carolina Dog is naturally suspicious of strangers. However, it is reserved, but affectionate around those familiar with it.

Hound Dog Breeds | From {D to G}

Dachshund

Dachshund

They’re ingenious and clever dogs that attempt to train their masters. Their curiosity makes them funny to observe over the years. Spry, energetic, snappish, and prone to loud barking, this dog is not for everyone.

Older children and doting, consistent pet owners do best with them. Their original uses included flushing out badgers, rabbits, and small varmints.

Their lithe, slender bodies could get into rodent holes and flush them out quickly. The Dachshund is a reddish-brown, short-coated German dog. The toy, or miniature, version weighs 8 to 11 pounds.

The standard Dachshund’s weight is between 11 to 32 pounds. The toy’s chest width is 12 inches, and the standard’s chest width is 14 to 18 inches. 

Dingo

Dingo Dog

Australia’s largest mammalian predator, Dingoes has been present in Australia for at least 3,500 years. They have an important biological role, helping suppress populations of wild animals.

Even though Dingoes are predominantly carnivorous, they will eat a wide variety of foods including plant material and insects. Dingoes are strongly territorial and form lifetime bonds with family, either Dingo or human. Cat-like in their agility, Dingoes use their paws like hands.

Drever

Drever

The Drever is a relatively new breed that is native to Sweden. It was developed from the Westphalian Basset and local hound breeds.

The Drever has an exceptional nose and is used primarily for hunting fox, hare, deer, and even wild boar. They also have a loud voice and enjoy hunting alone or in packs.

English Coonhound

English Coonhound

The English Coonhound’s history is said to be the history of all coonhounds. All of the UKC breeds have a common ancestry in the English Coonhound with the omission of the Plott Hound.

The English Coonhound was originally used to hunt foxes. Americans, through careful breeding practices, adapted the English Coonhound to hunt raccoon, opossum, cougar, and various bear species.

English Foxhound

English Foxhound

The English Foxhound was developed in the 13th century in Great Britain for trailing the red fox. This dog would lead the hunters mounted on horses in pursuit of the foxes.

In 1738, the English Foxhound was imported to North America and subsequently bred to a smaller size. Even though this dog was not bred to be a family dog, if raised from a puppy it would adapt well.

French Hound

French Hound

This French hunting dog is descended from ancient French breeds and comes in several varieties. Being brave, hardy, and full of stamina makes this breed an excellent hunter.

They hunt assertively in packs, but a firm owner is necessary to act as “leader of the pack.” The French Hounds’ area of expertise is deer.

German Hound

German Hound

The German Hound originated in the Sauerland region of northwestern Germany. This enthusiastic breed hunts hare and fox in the mountains and tracks wounded large game.

Its standard was not written until 1955. This dog needs plenty of wide-open spaces for daily exercise opportunities. Today, these dogs are often used as companions due to their even temper and calmness.

Greek Hound

Greek Hound

A medium-sized, swift, very agile dog, Greek Hounds are highly spirited and lovable. Brave, outgoing, intelligent, they make avid but not vicious hunters.

Its short, thick, coarse coat is predominantly black and tan. It carries a medium-length tail straight or slightly curved upward.

Its tapering head is long with large dark eyes, tight eyelids, a black nose, and flat round hanging ears. It is also called Hellenikos Ichnilatis, Hellenic Hound, or Greek Harehound.

Greyhound

Greyhound

The Greyhound can reach a top speed of close to 45 mph in under a few seconds. It was bred for coursing game, racing, and being a companion.

A curved spine, well-defined contours, an aerodynamic, sleek build, and a voluminous, deep chest make this breed especially good for racing.

The Greyhound, or English Greyhound, is a distant relative of herding dogs, and it’s a sighthound itself. They were probably in existence in the 5th and 6th centuries B.C., but no one can be certain. 

Hound Dog Breeds | From {H to M}

Halden Hound

Halden Hound

The Halden Hound is the smallest of three Norwegian hare hound breeds. First developed near 1900 in the Halden area in the southeast of Norway, the Halden Hound has never had a high number of dogs in the breed.

A strict breeding program has been successful in keeping inbreeding to a minimum. The breeds used to create the Halden Hound include the English Foxhounds, Beagles, and certain local Norwegian dogs.

Hamilton Hound

Hamilton Hound

This breed was developed by crossing German hounds with the English Foxhound. The Hamilton Hound was named after the founder of Sweden’s Kennel Club, Count Adolf Hamilton.

Hamilton developed this breed to hunt rabbits and fox and these dogs are able to do so in all types of weather and terrain. Today, this breed has become quite popular in Great Britain but remains rare in the rest of the world.

Harrier Hound

Harrier Hound

The Harrier is believed to be a cross between the English Foxhound, Fox Terriers, and Greyhounds. This dog was bred in England primarily to hunt hare and later for fox hunting.

Harriers are used most often to hunt in packs and have an excellent sense of smell to locate game. The Harrier is popular in England but rare elsewhere in the world.

Hellenic Hound

Hellenic Hound

The Hellenic Hound is native to Greece. This ancient breed is thought to have descended from hounds that were brought by the Phoenicians to Egypt.

The Hellenic Hound is a skilled hunter on many types of terrains. They are light on their feet and track game in small packs or on their own. This breed is rarely known outside of its homeland.

Holland hound

Stabyhouns

Holland hounds, also called Stabyhouns, Frisian pointers, or Dutch Hounds, is a rare dog breed. Chiefly originating from Holland’s Friesland province presumably from Spaniel-like hounds brought by Spaniards, they were used as watchdogs, mole, and polecat catchers, but mainly for hunting.

These medium-sized dogs are exceptional swimmers enabling retrieval of the game over large water areas. It is a wonderful all-around Dutch sporting, gun, and family dog appearing in black/white, brown/white, or orange/white colors.

Hungarian Greyhound

Hungarian Greyhound

The Hungarian Greyhound is thought to have descended from the Asian Greyhounds. Asian Greyhounds were brought to Hungary by the Magyars in the ninth century and then crossed with local hounds.

The Hungarian Greyhound might not be as fast as the Greyhound, however, it is more resilient and is also a vigorous tracker. They are used to hunt hare and foxes in Hungary.

Ibizan Hound

Ibizan Hound

The Ibizan Hound is one of the oldest breeds known to man and is very primitive. This is a versatile dog that uses its great eyesight to spot hare and its keen sense of smell for finding partridge.

The breed is also an incredible jumper. In the 1880s, the use of the Ibizan Hound for hunting hare was outlawed and the breed became extremely rare.

Irish Wolfhound

Irish Wolfhound

The Irish Wolfhound is a gigantic dog with a name attributable to its original purpose of hunting wolves.

This massive shaggy dog has been known to reach heights of 6 feet or more on its hind legs. Although its a hefty behemoth, its extremely gentled, congenial, and nice – especially with small children.

The CU is a direct ancestor that was bred for the purposes of warfare over 2,000 years ago by the Celts. The Irish, Scottish, and English adapted them for use on the farm and wolf pursuits.

They’ve also been used to hunt wild pigs and game animals like Elk. The Irish Wolfhound seizes the neck and crushes the spine.

In fact, boar and wolves are extinct animals in Ireland. They’re fierce creatures indeed. The Romans were incredibly frightened and judged them on par with Lions.

Italian Greyhound

Italian Greyhound

The Piccolo Levriero Italiano and acronym, IG, are two common names for the Italian Greyhound, a sighthound toy breed.

The fossilized remains of what appears to be an Italian Greyhound were unearthed in the vast complex of an Egyptian tomb that was over 6,000 years old.

Royalty from Russia, Denmark, England, Greece, Turkey, Italy, Rome, Egypt, Phoenicia, and Africa were taken by the breeds’ elegance, look, and temperament. Its popularity in Italy exclusively gave it the current name. 

Lurcher

Lurcher

The Lurcher is not considered a purebred dog. Normally, one of the parents is a member of the Greyhound family.

It is assumed that this type of dog was developed because in the past, in England only noble blood was allowed to own a Greyhound or any other sighthound. This cross produced a sound hunting companion for the commoners.

The Lurcher is generally an obedient dog making it an excellent coursing hound, hunter and companion.

Miniature Dachshund

Miniature Dachshund

Dachshund means “badger dog” in German. They were developed in Germany to hunt badgers over 300 years ago. Selective breeding and introduction of Pinscher, Papillion, and Schnauzer blood produced the Miniature Dachshund.

On average, this breed weighs 9 pounds. The Miniature Dachshund makes an excellent companion regardless of where you live.

Mountain Cur

Mountain Cur

The Mountain Cur came from Europe when early settlers came to America seeking for new lives. This breed was very instrumental in pioneering the Southern Mountains.

They say that the Mountain Curs were a necessity for many frontier families. They protected the family against wild animals and other dangers.

They also caught, treed, and holed animals, providing food for the family. Today, these dogs are used on squirrel, raccoon, and all types of big game.

Hound Dog Breeds | From {N to R}

Norwegian Elkhound

Norwegian Elkhound

The Norwegian Elkhound is sometimes referred to as the Norsk Elghund Gra or Norsk Elghund Sort in the native tongue.

The dog is one of the most ancient breeds, and it’s a Spitz-type as well. Norway has memorialized it as the dog of the nation. Blistering cold, subzero extreme weather, rugged mountainous terrain, and dense forests only invigorate this breed more.

Well, it’s not to say that it doesn’t enjoy some quiet time by the warm fire. It was bred to guard, protect, herd, and help. It’s a dog bred for function, and Norway has some temperatures and vocations that call for such a dog.

Otterhound

Otterhound

The Otterhound was developed to help control the otter population in England. Today, otter hunting has been banned.

The Otterhound is known for its musical voice that it tends to use freely. This breed has webbed feet to assist it in swimming, is extremely energetic and must be allowed plenty of exercise and time for exploring.

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen

This scent hound was developed to hunt small game in the rough and tough territory of the Vendeen region in France.

The breed originated from its stronger and bigger forerunner the Griffon Vendeen during the 16th century. The Petit Basset Griffon Vendeen is a happy dog that enjoys using its voice quite often.

Petit Bleu de Gascogne

Petit Bleu de Gascogne

The Petit Bleu de Gascogne is believed to have descended from the scenting hounds of the Phoenician and Gaul hound trade and the Grand Bleu de Gascogne.

They were mostly used to hunt hare near the southwestern coast of France, where they were developed. The Petit Bleu de Gascogne has an even temperament and is sociable with other breeds of dogs as well.

Pharaoh Hound

Pharaoh Hound

The Pharaoh Hound originated in ancient Egypt and some hypothesize that these are the oldest domesticated dogs in history.

The Pharaoh Hound made its way to the Mediterranean islands of Malta and Gozo and has been there for over 2,000 years. It is the national dog of Malta and has primarily been bred for rabbit hunting.

Plott Hound

Plott Hound

Jonathan Plott developed the Plott Hound in the 1750s in the mountains of North Carolina. This is the only known breed to have been developed in North Carolina and is the state dog.

The breed is considered a legendary hunting dog, known for its courage and tenacity. It was initially used as a wild boarhound, but has also been used for big game hunting.

Polish Hound

Polish Hound

The Polish Hound was used to hunt foxes, hares, and wild boars. As with other hound dogs that originated in or inhabited Poland, the Polish Hound had a pure and resonant voice.

These dogs would track their quarry with great persistence signing the entire time. Near the end of the 19th century, the Polish Hound was almost extinct and not until after World War II did two Colonels restore the breed.

Redbone Coonhound

Redbone Coonhound

The Redbone Coonhound was developed using red foxhounds brought to America by Scottish immigrants and the Red Irish Foxhound that was introduced before the Civil War.

Breeders focused initially only on developing a showy, red dog. After this was accomplished, the focus was shifted to performance. This breed makes an excellent treeing dog and it has a pleasant voice also.

Rhodesian Ridgeback

Rhodesian Ridgeback

The Rhodesian Ridgeback is also called the Ridgeback, Lion Dog, African Lion Dog, Van Rooyen’s Lion Dog, or African Lion Hound.

The many references to Lions in their colloquially sounding names suggest involvement with the King of the Jungle. In fact, they’re used to annoy and hold back Lions so that the hunter can get a good shot and have a clean kill.

Pet owners must know that they dislike rough play, taunting, or any kind of annoyance. However, their gentle, kind nature wouldn’t suggest sensitivities to pestering.

Their cunning savagery and wild barbarity on the hunt speak nothing of their sweet domestic traits. Its name, Ridgeback, is clearly attributable to the ridge of hair running along their back in the opposite direction. The Rhodesian Ridgeback is a hound that hails from Southern Africa, i.e., Cape Colony. 

Hound Dog Breeds | From {S to W}

Saluki

Saluki

The Saluki is possibly as old as the oldest civilization. Known as the royal dog of Egypt, they were often mummified like the Pharaohs and their pictures appear in tombs dating from 2100 BC.

The Saluki, a brilliant desert sight hunter, capable of incredible speed and agility over rough terrain, was used to course the swift gazelle. They are a pleasant and calm companion and make good watchdogs.

Scottish Deerhound

Scottish Deerhound

Throughout history, great value has been set on the Deerhound. The history of the breed teems with romance, increasing in splendor right down through the Age of Chivalry when no one of rank lower than an earl might possess these dogs.

Records of the Middle Ages allude repeatedly to the delightful attributes of this charming hound, its tremendous courage in the chase, and its gentle dignity in the house.

Silken Windhound

Silken Windhound

The Silken Windhound was developed out of the desire for a small longhaired sighthound. It was developed in part with the Whippet and the Borzoi.

The breed is very social with other dogs and people. It adapts to family life very quickly and loves adults and children alike. These dogs also have a strong desire to please their owner.

Serbian Tri-Colored Hound

Serbian Tri-Colored Hound

Formerly known as the Yugoslavian Tricolour Hound this breed is a rare breed that was developed in Yugoslavia. It is a small hunting dog that is used for pursuing small games over rough terrain.

These dogs have a keen sense of smell and great stamina. These responsive dogs will do just about anything to please their owner. They make an excellent choice for a pet, as well.

Tazy

Tazy Dog

The Tazy is silky sighthound also possessing a keen nose. It is tan, black and tan, or gray in color. A native of the desert lands near the Caspian Sea, this nearly extinct breed specialized in hare, fox, marmot, some hooved game, and wolf chasing.

Known to have aided in owner survival, this dog needs a human companion who can appreciate its strong will, and life-sacrificing, courageous traits.

Thai Ridgeback

Thai Ridgeback

The Thai Ridgeback is believed to have originated in Southeast Thailand or Cambodia. This breed is very rare and very few Thai Ridgebacks are found outside of their native land.

In Thailand, they have principally been used for guarding livestock and homes. More recently, they have also been seen in the show ring and as companion dogs. This breed is a hunting dog that has subsisted for thousands of years.

Transylvanian Hound

Transylvanian Hound

The Transylvanian Hound is a scent hound that originated in the 9th century in Hungary. The Magyars brought in hounds and crossed them with local breeds and Polish hounds. Royalty and nobility used this breed to hunt bear, stag, boar, wolf, and lynx.

The Transylvanian Hound has an excellent sense of direction and sharp nose that made it an indispensable companion and hunter in the mountainous regions in Hungary.

Treeing Walker Coonhound

Treeing Walker Coonhound

The Treeing Walker Coonhound was developed in the United States by George Washington Maupin and John W.Walker. First, Thomas Walker of Virginia imported English Foxhounds in 1742 that were used to develop the Treeing Walker Coonhound.

The breed does what its name insinuates; it “trees” its quarry and then sounds off, revealing to the hunter that it has been successful. This dog enjoys attention from its owner and will make a pleasant companion.

Tyrolean Hound

Tyrolean Hound

The Tyrolean Hound is a versatile hunting dog that is used by hunters in the mountains and woods. It originated from the Celtic Hound around 1500 in Austria.

The Tyrolean Hound has been used as a scent hound for hunting fox and hare, as well as a tracking dog for all types of game.

Whippet

Whippet

The Whippet is a cross between the Greyhound, the Italian Greyhound, and Terriers. Its name came from the term “whip it” which means to move quickly. This dog was bred to chase and capture small game.

The Whippet can reach speeds of up to 37 miles per hour (60km per hour) in mere seconds. This breed is adaptable to living indoors with children and other pets, provided they are given plenty of exercise opportunities.

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